Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Anna Remus
EDMT 380 - 001
Fall 2004

project 2
rule

Exploring our Wild, Wild Weather
Storyboard & Script


Scene 1.
TEXT:
Certain images and motion media included in this video fall under the Fair Use exemption of the U.S. Copyright Law. They have been prepared according to the educational multimedia fair use guidelines and are restricted from further use.

PRODUCTION NOTES:
White text (Verdana) on black background.The text will scroll up.

FADE IN

 

 

 


CUT

Scene 2.
STILL PHOTO:
Flash of lightning

SOUND:
Crack of lightning

 

 

CUT

Scene 3.
TEXT:
Exploring our Wild, Wild Weather

PRODUCTION NOTES:
White text (Verdana) on black background. The words will fly in.

SOUND:
Howling wind

FADE IN

 



CUT

Scene 4.
STILL PHOTO:
Picture of a dark sky during a thunderstorm.

SOUND:
Thunder, wind whistling, and rain.

 

NARRATOR:
A tornado is a violently rotating column of air extending from a thunderstorm to the ground. Tornadoes form several thousand feet above the earth's surface. It is not uncommon for the wind to die down and the air to become very still before a tornado hits.

 

CUT

Scene 5.
VIDEO:
Short video clip of a tornado in action.

 

 

FADE IN

NARRATOR:
A tornado forms when warm, moist air mixes with cool, dry air and fuels a storm. If the winds are lined up just right, with enough strength, the storm spins like a top.


FADE OUT

Scene 6.
STILL PHOTO:
Picture of the Fujita Scale.

 

 

 

NARRATOR:
Tornadoes are nature's most violent storms with wind speeds up to 300 miles per hour. An F-Scale or Fujita Scale is used to measure the strength of tornadoes by how much damage is done. The scale ranges from F0-F5.


CUT

Scene 7a.
STILL PHOTO:
Picture of little damage caused by an F0 tornado.

NARRATOR:
An F0 tornado causes broken branches and trees to be uprooted. There may also be damage to road signs and billboards.

 

CROSS DISSOLVE

Scene 7b.
STILL PHOTO:
Picture of severe damage caused by an F3 tornado.

NARRATOR:
An F3 tornado causes roofs and walls to be torn off well-constructed houses. Trees are uprooted, heavy cars are lifted off the ground, and trains are overturned.

 

CROSS DISSOLVE

Scene 7c.
STILL PHOTO:
Picture of incredible damage caused by an F5 tornado.

NARRATOR:
An F5 tornado completely destroys houses and throws cars as far as 100 meters through the air. It also strips the trees of all their bark.

CUT

Scene 8.
STILL PHOTO:
A map of "Tornado Alley."

NARRATOR:
Tornado Alley is a part of the United States where tornadoes are most likely to occur. These states include parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, eastern Colorado, and western Iowa. Tornadoes are common in Tornado Alley because of the Rocky Mountains to the west and the Gulf of Mexico to the south.

 

FADE OUT

Scene 9.
TEXT:
Written and Produced by KAL Productions
Narrators: Kristie Heier, Anna Remus, Leah Benzschawel
Fall, 2004

PRODUCTION NOTES:
Rolling Centered Credits
White text (Verdana) on black background

FADE IN

 

 


 

CUT

Scene 10.
TEXT:
References/Citations/Sources Listed
http://www.spc.noaa.gov/faq/tornado/f-scale.html
http://www.tornadoproject.com/
http://whyfiles.org/013tornado/2.html
http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/NWSTornado/
http://www.fema.gov/kids/tornado.htm
http://www.spc.noaa.gov/faq/tornado/index.html

PRODUCTION NOTES:
White text (Verdana) on black background.

ROLLING CENTERED CREDITS

 


 


CUT


| Draft Lesson Plan | Final Lesson Plan | Storyboard | Treatment | Project #1 | Project #2 | Main |

Page Last Updated: December 6, 2004
Questions? Contact remusaj@uwec.edu